Hair Porosity Test


Finally all the years of studying biology has paid off!!  In order to test your hair porosity, you will need to start with a clean, product free hair.

  1. Take a piece of hair that has recently shed and place it in the water filled sink/bowl.
  2. Healthy hair should float because it has a sealed cuticle and therefore does not absorb water.
  3. Excessively or high porous hair has open cuticle which will soak up water and sink.

Porosity is the term used in the science of hair care to describe how easily water and other matter can diffuse back and forth through the cuticle layer and into or out of the cortex. Hair is much like a sponge, capable of absorbing water and other substances from the environment, and also susceptible to losing precious moisture and lipids to the environment. Maintaining an optimal balance of moisture in your hair preserves its suppleness, strength, and shine. This is especially important for those of us with curly hair, as it greatly influences the health and beauty of our tresses.

Low Porosity: Hair described as having low porosity is characterized by a very tightly bound cuticle layer, where the individual cuticle scales lie flat and overlap one another. Low porosity hair is often quite shiny, especially if it is a darker color. Overall this type of hair is considered to be quite healthy. If your hair repels water when you attempt to wet it, that is a good indication that it has low porosity. It can be quite difficult to process, because it resists penetration of the chemicals being used.

Low porosity hair is more prone to an excessive accumulation of protein if deep conditioning products are used and will feel very stiff and straw-like. It requires products rich in moisture and emollients and also benefits most from products that contain humectants, which attract moisture to the hair and hold it there. If hair with very few or very small openings becomes dry for some reason, it can be more difficult to restore proper moisture balance to it. In this case, a deep conditioning treatment with moderate heat would be a good way to ensure the cuticle is sufficiently opened up to allow moisture to enter into the cortex.

Normal Porosity: Hair possessing average porosity will generally require the least amount of maintenance. It allows moisture to pass into the cortex as needed, but resists permitting too much water to penetrate. Repeated works by various research groups have found that healthy hair of average porosity can absorb water up to a maximum of 31.1% by weight. Normal porosity hair has a tendency to hold styles well. Coloring can be done in a predictable manner, following the usual guidelines of the product. However, one must note that this process will damage the hair and increase its porosity over time. An occasional deep conditioning treatment with a protein-containing product will be of benefit, but proteins should not be included in the daily regimen.

Opened highly porous cuticle

High Porosity: High porosity is an unfortunate result of damage to the hair. Chemical processes, harsh treatment, and environmental exposure are all responsible for causing cumulative, irreversible damage to the cuticle layer. This damage creates gaps and holes in the surface of the hair shaft—essentially chinks in its armor. Hair with this type of uneven, pitted and rough surface is prone to damage from more and more sources, resulting in a cascade of effects that culminate in unmanageable and unlovely locks.

Hair with a great deal of porosity has been found to be capable of absorbing significantly higher amounts of water than hair or normal or low porosity (up to 55%, in contrast with 31.1% for healthy hair). Excessive absorption of water from the atmosphere causes frizz and tangling on humid days. Total immersion of high porosity hair during bathing, swimming, or shampooing can lead to significant breakage due to loss of elasticity from the sheer weight of the water absorbed. It also takes on color much more quickly and in higher concentrations than normal porosity hair when undergoing a chemical color process.

People with high porosity hair should use products with lots of moisturizers and emollients and also use anti-humectants in high heat and humidity climates in order to seal their cuticle against excessive absorption of moisture from the air. Protein treatments can also be very helpful for patching some of the holes in the hair, but one must follow-up with moisturizing products in order to avoid a stiff texture. Rinsing with a slightly acidic rinse will help flatten and seal the cuticle. Some clear color applications have proteins in them than can patch the gaps in your hair also. Consult your professional hair stylist for more information about such products.

Heat treatments: Heat from a blow dryer, flat iron, curling iron, or hot curlers can all cause irreparable damage both to the cuticle and the cortex of the hair. These tools can heat water inside the hair past the boiling point and cause the hair to rupture from the inside out. It is not difficult to see how this could increase porosity.

Mechanical Damage: Combing, brushing and friction from scarves, and hats, and scrunchies all cause damage to the cuticle layer. Over time all of these can result in torn and ripped cuticles, thereby increasing the porosity of the hair. Curly hair should only be combed with a wide-tooth comb while it is wet and coated with a conditioner for maximum slip. This minimizes friction and subsequent damage to the scales.

Shampooing with sulfates and soaps: In previous articles, we have discussed that the cuticle layer is comprised not only of keratinous scales, but also a layer of fatty acids on the top surface that protect the hair from moisture, as well as a layer beneath the scales called the cell membrane complex (CMC). The CMC acts as cushion and as a cement the keep the cuticle scales firmly attached to the hair. A large portion of this CMC is made up of a lipid layer of mixed fatty acids, including 18-methyleicosanioc acid (18-MEA), stearic acid, and palmitic acid.

At normal formulation levels (15-20%), harsh surfactants in shampoos, such as SLS, SLES, ALS, and ALES, are capable of dissolving the lipid layer in the CMC and removing the 18-MEA from the surface of the cuticle. This creates irreparable gaps in the cuticle layer, increasing porosity of the hair. Also, by dissolving the protective fatty acid layer from the surface of the cuticle, the hair is rendered more hydrophilic (water-loving), which is a very dangerous state for hair as it becomes more susceptible to frizz, tangling, and damage to the cuticle scales. This information merely confirms what we have been told about the hazards of using these types of surfactants on our hair.

What to do? Prevention is the best medicine when it comes to porosity problems.

  • Use the right products for your hair.
  • Avoid harsh surfactants and soaps.
  • Only comb tangles with a wide-toothed comb when hair is wet and saturated with conditioner.
  • Avoid chemical processes as much as possible.
  • Avoid thermal styling tools.
  • Protect your hair from the sun and the elements.
  • Get regular trims.
  • Treat your hair as gently as you would an expensive cashmere sweater!

 

If you already have a problem with high porosity, please make sure you have an excellent deep conditioning treatment available, preferably one that contains proteins. Use lots of conditioning and moisturizing products, especially those containing natural, plant-based oils. Avoid all of the sulfate-based surfactants and soap bars. Use a mildly acidic rinse regularly and avoid humectants. If possible, avoid the processes that created the high porosity, and get your hair trimmed regularly. These things should help restore your hair to a more manageable porosity level, but it will take time.

Protect your cuticle!

About nawlins natural

Looking to share my natural hair journey. I have been natural for 2yrs and enjoy sharing my knowledge and enjoy learning different techniques of how to care for my natural hair. I believe in the most high power, Jesus Christ and maintain a positive outlook for my life. My motto is "Something wonderful is going to happen!" Please follow me on Twitter @allierucks my Facebook Page Natural Hair Community
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9 Responses to Hair Porosity Test

  1. Heather says:

    love it love it love it!!!!!!! I had no idea how to know the porosity of my hair!!!! thanks

  2. Wow, your blog is like a school for me. I am about to going on natural hair care regime, though i have been making my skin care products for a while. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Audrey says:

    In the UK we don’t have as many wonderful products as you do. I started on my natural adventure years back but got frustrated as I didn’t know how to care it, some hairdressers told me that it needed relaxing and got convinced to go back to chemicals. I am determined to make a proper go next year armed with all information and a sister who is totally natural though with a totally different hair type. Thank you xxx

    • Hi Audrey, one of my favorite product makers is UK based in London as a matter of fact, the line is called TLC Naturals here is the site http://www.tlcnaturalsonline.com/. I use her products all the time…Even if you don’t have access to everything if you get some dried rosemary, thyme or basil even sage they do wonders for your hair relaxed & natural in a tea rinse that will stimulate growth & curb shedding!!

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